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ASEAN Communication :
Date Post :  12-01-2015

Brunei Darussalam 

http://www.ambd.gov.bn/monetary-operations/currency-management-currency-design-mint-gallery

Minting of coins

The minting of coins in Brunei started on 1st May 2001 and previously it was a responsibility undertaken by the Brunei Currency and Monetary Board of the Ministry of Finance (before the merger to partly form AMBD). The denominations available are 1 cent, 5 cents, 10 cents, 20 cents and 50 cents. These coins, if they have not been tampered with, are legal tender up to their face value with the following restrictions:

  1. Coins of the denomination exceeding $1, for the payment of any amount
  2.  Coins of the denomination of 50 cent and $1, for the payment of an amount not exceeding $10
  3. Coins of any lower denomination than 50 cent, for the payment of an amount not exceeding $2

Commemorative Issues

Republic of the Union of Myanmar

http://www.cbm.gov.mm/content/series-bank-notes-and-coins

History of Bank Notes

Under section 8 of the Central Bank of Myanmar Law, The Central Bank of Myanmar is acting as the sole issuer of domestic currency, either bank notes or coins. As the monetary authority it’s the central Bank of Myanmar formulate and implements monetary policy, with the aim to preserve the value of the Myanmar currency and to promote efficient payments mechanisms.

Before Myanmar gained independence from the British, Myanmar was one of the states of India. At that time the Myanmar currency was rupee. Both Burmese and Indian rupees were linked to the Sterling and worth one shilling and sixpence.

The First Schedule of the Currency and Coinage Act of 1946 provided for an issue of 1,5,10,100 rupees currency notes and the Second Schedule for the Board to issue its own coins of 20 and 50 rupees. The notes were to have a peacock watermark, and to be authenticated by the Chairman of the Board. The reverses illustrated various national occupations, with GOVERNMENT OF BURMA in English and marked BURMA CURRENCY LEGAL TENDER IN BURMA ONLY.

When Burma gained independence from the British, it became a republic and the heading on the note was changed to GOVERNMENT OF THE UNION OF BURMA. As the Burma Currency Board notes increased in number, it was decided to demonetize all those India notes marked “ Legal Tender in Burma Only “ from 1st July 1948. All denominations of coins were released into circulation on 20th July 1950.

With the passage of the Union Bank of Burma Act, 1952, the sole right of currency issued was transferred from the Burma Currency Board to a newly created Currency Department of the Union Bank of Burma with effect from 1st July 1952. The Burma Currency Board was abolished and its asset and liabilities were transferred to the Union Bank of Burma. Another important change in the new currency is the conversion to a decimal system.

Coins were made in nickel; denominations of ½ , 1,2,4 and 8 pe and  all had the Chinthe (lion) on the obverse, with vale and AD date in wreath on the reverse. But ½ , 1,2 pe coins were demonetized 1st November 1953. Moreover, the English name for the unit of currency was changed to kyat and decimalized into 100 pyas in 1952. Previously, one rupee was equivalent to16 pe (64 pyas). When the unit of currency was changed one kyat was equivalent to 100 pyas.

When the Union Bank of Burma took over the central bank’s responsibilities, a token issue of the bank notes was made on 1st July 1952. As already explained, the new bank notes had the rupee denominations (1,5,10,100 rupees) that was later connected to kyat. It included peacock water mark. The second issue of bank notes was made in 1958, all with a portrait of Aung San with a peaked cap. The 1,5,10 and 100 kyat were introduced on 12th February 1958 (Union Day), and the 20 and 50 kyat on 21st August. This was the first issue of 20 and 50 kyat notes made for Burma.

The decimal series of coins order from the Royal Mint constituted of 1,5,10,25,50pyas and 1 kyat. Those coins have more inscriptions but the Burmese Lion or Chinthe remains. A start was made at putting them into circulation on 1st October 1952 with the 5 and 10 pyas.

When the revolutionary government took power, it was announced that the high denominations 50 and 100 kyat notes would no longer be legal tender from 17th May 1964 and the new People’s Bank of Burma notes of 1,5,10 and 20 kyats were issued on 30th April 1965, with a portrait of Aung San from his wartime army days. 20 kyats note issued in 1958 and 1964 was demonetized on 3rd November 1985. The existing notes were to be legal tender until they had been withdrawn from circulation.

On 30th September 1972 the People’s Bank was renamed the Union of Burma Bank and 25 kyats were issued. All denominations of coins of the former Union Bank of Burma continued to be legal tender at the time of the 25 kyats note issue. New 1 kyat notes followed on 30th December 1972to circulate alongside People’s Bank 1 kyat and on 30th June 1973 the 10 kyats notes was issued. The 5 kyats note appeared on 31st October 1973, to circulate alongside People’s Bank and Union Bank 5 kyats notes. Union of Burma Bank issued and released  in circulation 100 Kyats note on 17th April 1976, 50 Kyats on 30th April 1979, 75 Kyats on 11th November 1985 and 35 Kyats on 1st August 1986 respectively. Moreover, the Union of Burma Bank issued 45 kyats note and 90 kyats note in 22nd September 1987. 100 Kyats note issued in 1952 was demonetized on 17th May 1964. 100 Kyats that issued in 1976 and 50 Kyats issued in 1975 were demonetized on 3rd November 1985. Kyats 25, 35 and 75 notes were also withdrawn from circulation on 5th September 1987.

During 1979 an F.A.O (United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization) 50 pyas also appeared, as well as 50 kyats note. Both the F.A.O coins are reported to have been minted at Security Printing Works Factory.

After the State Laws and Order Restoration Council took power in 1988, the Central Bank of Myanmar issued Lion series and Aung San series was replaced by gradually. Denominations are  1,5,10,20,50,100,200,500 and 1000 kyats notes and 1,5,10,50 and 100 kyats coins. The color of the 1 kyat coin is bronze color, the 5 and 10 kyats coins are golden yellow color and the 50 and 100 kyats coins are silver color respectively on 1st October 2009 Central Bank of Myanmar issued new currency notes of 5000 kyats to easier handling for the people.   And new currency notes of 10000 kyats issued to the public effect from 15th June 2012.

Kingdom of Cambodia 

http://www.coinsweekly.com/en/Archive/8?&id=2563&type=n

http://www.nbc.org.kh/english/nbc_gallery/ancient_commemorative_coins.php

Commemorative Coin

Cambodian Commemorative 3,000 Riels Silver Proof Coin

2013 is the 60th anniversary of the establishment of diplomatic relations between Japan and Cambodia in 1953. On this occasion, the Japan Mint has been commissioned by the National Bank of Cambodia to manufacture a silver coin that is Cambodian legal tender to mark the 60th anniversary of friendship between the two countries. This silver coin is a color coin with a proof finish. Its design includes the Angkor Wat, a symbol of the Khmer Empire, one of the largest religious monuments in the world and a World Heritage Site, on the obverse, and the official logo of the 60th Anniversary of Friendship between Japan and Cambodia on the reverse. A number of cooperation projects to preserve and restore the Angkor Monuments have been conducted by the Japanese government and civil organizations.

Gold medal

Gold medal issued in 1994, commemorating the 72nd birthday of His Majesty Preah Bat Samdech Preah Norodom Sihanoul Varaman, King of Cambodia.

Cambodian Cupro-Nickel Coin

Ancient Cambodian Silver Proof Coin

Cambodia Ancient Naga Coin Nordic-Gold Proof-Like Coin

"SLEUNG" is the first monetary unit in Cambodia. During the reign of King Preah SREY CHETHA or sdech Korn (1512-1525), gold and silver coins with SLEUNG face values were put into circulation. The issuance of such coins stimulated economic growth in Cambodia and expanded its trade with foreign countries during the 16th century.

To commemorate the first monetary unit of Kingdom of Cambodia, the National Bank of Cambodia has reproduced the SLEUNG coins in both silver and Nordic-gold. The respective coin specifications of each coin are given in the respective certificates.

The obverse design features the mystical Naga with seven heads. The reverse design features the Khmer script "Krong Kampuchea" (meaning Cambodia) and "Mouy Sleung" (meaning one SLEUNG). The present monetary unit of Cambodia is the RIEL.

Cambodia Ancient Naga Coin 999 Silver Proof Coin

"SLEUNG" is the first monetary unit in Cambodia. During the reign of King Preah SREY CHETHA or sdech Korn (1512-1525), gold and silver coins with SLEUNG face values were put into circulation. The issuance of such coins stimulated economic growth in Cambodia and expanded its trade with foreign countries during the 16th century.

To commemorate the first monetary unit of Kingdom of Cambodia, the National Bank of Cambodia has reproduced the SLEUNG coins in both silver and Nordic-gold. The respective coin specifications of each coin are given in the respective certificates.

The obverse design features the mystical Naga with seven heads. The reverse design features the Khmer script "Krong Kampuchea" (meaning Cambodia) and "Mouy Sleung" (meaning one SLEUNG). The present monetary unit of Cambodia is the RIEL.

Cambodian Silver Proof Coin

During the reign of King Norodom from 1859 to 1904, two types of currencies (coins) were minted for use in Cambodia. One was made of bronze (mostly copper) and the other was made of silver. These coins feature both Khmer and French Characters.

Although issued by the Authority in the 19th century, these coins were rarely functional, as most family and commercial trades were transacted through barter trading (either exchanging one product for another product, or labour for product). And most traders offer their products to farmers in exchange for farm produces.

This is the replica of the silver coin that was minted in 1869 with coins denomination of French "Quatre Francs".

Republic of Indonesia

Note:
EY = Emission Year

Ref:  http://www.bi.go.id/en/sistem-pembayaran/instrumen/data-uang/Contents/Default.aspx

This link is to the circulated coins:

http://www.bi.go.id/en/sistem-pembayaran/instrumen/uang-khusus/Contents/Default.aspx

*Source – Central Bank of Indonesia

Lao People’s Democratic Republic

This link is to the circulated coins:

http://www.bol.gov.la/english/money1.html

Lao Peoples Democratic Republic

          Currency reform: 16 th December 1979

          1 new kip = 100 liberation kip

          The Government of Lao PDR has put into circulation new kip (National Bank Kip) to replace Lao liberation kip.

-          First issue in 1979: 1 kip, 5 kip, 10 kip, 20 kip and 50 kip

-          Second issue in 1986: 100 kip

-          Third issue in 1988: 500 kip

-          Fourth issue in 1992 - 1996: 1000 kip. Note dated 1994 and 1996 have a security thread.

1000 kip of 1998 reissue

-          Fifth issue in 1997: 2000 kip and 5000 kip

-          Fifth issue in 1997: 2000 kip and 5000 kip

-          Seventh issue in 2006: 50,000 kip

This link is to the circulated coins:

http://www.bol.gov.la/together_use/coin_g_s.pdf*Source – Central Bank of Laos

Malaysia

This link is to the circulated and commemorative coins (53 pages):

http://colnect.com/en/coins/list/page/1/currency/64-RM_-_Malaysian_ringgit/country/2094-Malaysia

http://en.numista.com/catalogue/index.php?r=malaysia&cc=y&cn=y&cu=y&cat=y&mode=simplifie&p=1&e=&d=&km=&i=&v=&m=&a=&t=&dg=&w=&g

Malaya - Dollar (1939-1953)

100 cents = 1 dollar

See also: Malaysia, Singapore, Straits Settlements, Malaya and British Borneo

Verified sheet, complete year list5 Cents - George VI – obverse5 Cents - George VI – reverse 5 Cents - George VI

1939-1941

Silver (.750) – 1.36 g – ø 15.6 mm

KM# 3

Malaysia - Ringgit (1967-date)

100 sen = 1 ringgit

See also: Malay peninsula, Malaya, Straits Settlements, Malaya and British Borneo, North Borneo, Sarawak

Verified sheet, complete year list1 Sen – obverse1 Sen – reverse 1 Sen

1967-1981

Bronze – 1.95 g – ø 18 mm

KM# 1

Verified sheet, complete year list1 Sen – obverse1 Sen – reverse 1 Sen

1973-1988

Copper plated Steel – 1.72 g – ø 17.69 mm

KM# 1a

Verified sheet, complete year list1 Sen – obverse1 Sen – reverse 1 Sen

1989-2008

Bronze clad Steel – 1.8 g – ø 17.66 mm

KM# 49

Verified sheet, complete year list5 Sen - Agong – obverse5 Sen - Agong – reverse 5 Sen - Agong

1967-1988

Copper-nickel – 1.42 g – ø 16 mm

KM# 2

Verified sheet, complete year list5 Sen – obverse5 Sen – reverse 5 Sen

1989-2011

Copper-nickel – 1.41 g – ø 16.25 mm

KM# 50

Verified sheet, partially complete year list5 Sen – obverse5 Sen – reverse 5 Sen

2011-2014

Stainless Steel – 1.72 g – ø 17.78 mm

KM# 201

Verified sheet, complete year list10 Sen - Agong – obverse10 Sen - Agong – reverse 10 Sen - Agong

1967-1988

Copper-nickel – 2.82 g – ø 19.4 mm

KM# 3

Verified sheet, complete year list10 Sen - Agong – obverse10 Sen - Agong – reverse 10 Sen - Agong

1989-2011

Copper-nickel – 2.82 g – ø 19.4 mm

KM# 51

Verified sheet, partially complete year list10 Sen – obverse10 Sen – reverse 10 Sen

2011-2014

Stainless Steel – 2.98 g – ø 18.8 mm

KM# 202

The Republic of the Philippines

This link is to the circulated coins:

http://www.bsp.gov.ph/bspnotes/curr_bsp_coins.asp

This link is to the circulated coins:

http://www.bsp.gov.ph/bspnotes/comm_coins.asp

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